Methods of Clamming

TONGING                                                                     

Clam tongs are used from a boat. One of the preferred boats of baymen is the garvey. The clam tong handles, called stales, work like scissors. A pin holds the stales together so it can open and close the basket. The stales can be different sizes depending on the tide. The tooth bar is metal to dig in the mud. The teeth are on an angle to dig.

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SCRATCH RAKING   

To use a scratch rake you must get in the water. In water about waste deep, you keep raking back and forth until you feel a clam. Then, you scoop up the clam.

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TREADING

Treading is a method of clamming that requires the clammer to get into the water and feel for clams with their feet. When you feel a clam, you simply bend down and pick up the clam. Hopefully, you don’t have a crab by mistake!

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RAKING

A shinicock rake is another type of rake that is used while the clammer remains in the boat. It has a handle in the shape of a t and a large metal rake at the end. Many clams can be dug up at a time using this method.

 

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